Last Of Our Kinds
Yuksek & Oh Land — 251 PLAYS

boyfriend-music:

Yuksek & Oh Land Last Of Our Kinds

I’ll keep my mouth shut
If you promise me you can be my King Kong
I wanna tame the wild and prove to you
We can survive in our kingdom

 Extraball
Yuksek — 337 PLAYS

properandangerous:

This is my new NEW jam guys. press play and become one with the beautiousness of the music

davidbalicki:

Yuksek, Reims, 2011.

davidbalicki:

Yuksek, Reims, 2011.

 On A Train
Yuksek — 1.191 PLAYS

dickdandyke:

yuksek | on a train

fairytalesarenotforkids:

THE KELPIE

The kelpie is a supernatural water horse from Celtic folklore that is believed to haunt the rivers and lochs of Scotland and Ireland.

In folklore and mythology, the kelpie is described as a strong and powerful horse. Its hide was supposedly black (though in some stories it was white), and appeared as a lost pony, but could be identified by its constantly dripping mane. Its skin was said to be like that of a seal, smooth but as cold as death when touched. Kelpies were said to transform into beautiful women to lure men into their traps. They created illusions to keep themselves hidden, keeping only their eyes above water to scout the surface.

The fable of the kelpie varies by region. Other versions of the myth describe the kelpie as “green as glass with a black mane and tail that curves over its back like a wheel” or that, even in human form, they are always dripping wet and/or have water weeds in their hair.

The water horse is a common form of the kelpie, said to lure humans, especially children, into the water to drown and eat them. The water horse would encourage children to ride on its back, and once its victims fell into its trap, the water horse’s skin would become adhesive and the horse would bear the children into the river, dragging them to the bottom of the water and devouring them—except the heart or liver. A common Scottish tale is the story of nine children lured onto a kelpie’s back, while a tenth kept his distance. The kelpie chased the tenth child, but he escaped. Another more gruesome variation on this tale is that the tenth child simply stroked the kelpie’s nose but, when his hand stuck to it, he took a knife from his pocket and cut his own hand off, cauterizing it with wood from a nearby fire. The child saves himself but is unable to help his friends, as they are pulled underwater with the kelpie.

There was one way in which a kelpie could be defeated and tamed; the kelpies power of shape shifting was said to reside in its bridle, and anybody who could claim possession of it could force the kelpie to submit to their will. A kelpie in subjugation was highly prized, it had the strength of at least 10 horses and the endurance of many more, but the fairy races were always dangerous captives especially those as malignant as the Kelpie.

[Art: Jessica Seamans | ? | ?]

valkyriansass:

                                 Kelpies -whether in the form of a water horse or a beautiful woman- lure their prey to the depths through temptation.

valkyriansass:

                                 Kelpies -whether in the form of a water horse or a beautiful woman- lure their prey to the depths through temptation.